A medical NEXUS letter is the link between your disability and an event which occurred in service. We talk a lot about your NEXUS letter because it can be the most critical aspect to winning your disability claim.

 

1. What is a NEXUS?

The NEXUS letter is written document linking your current injury to an event which you were apart of. After speaking with a medical professional, they can write the letter on your behalf explaining the connection between service and your disability claim.

What happens for many Veterans is they are fearful of going to the doctor because of some repercussion they feel could result from going to see a doctor. An example is that you are a gun owner and are worried that if you see someone for PTSD, they could take away your weapons. While this isn’t true, it is a very common misconception for Veterans.

By having a medical professional write you a NEXUS letter, they will give you an exam and then write about your PTSD, hearing loss, etc. and explain why you have not been going to see the VA doctors. By having this link written out, it could result in you being awarded the amount you deserve.

 

2. How to get your NEXUS

If you are already being treated by a doctor, this is your best bet to get a medical NEXUS from them. They have already seen your files and have formed a relationship with you. The next choice for you should be a VA doctor. They know what you need on your file and can write it correctly.

Our VA Claims Insider Elite program has doctors on our team who have worked with Veterans for years and knows what the VA is looking for. After making an appointment with you, they will hear your story and write your letter.

A significant aspect of having an outside doctor write your letter is to make sure that they include they have reviewed all of your files before making this statement.

 

3. When and what to submit

Submitting your NEXUS letter early in the process is best for your outcome. It will be more beneficial for you to submit your claim during the early stages for the statement to be reviewed first.

An important aspect to note is that the purpose of this letter is not to “get around the VA.” Instead, you are getting as much evidence as possible to prove to the government that your statement is true. With this, it is important for the doctor writing your letter includes specific terms for the VA. The opinion must be written as one of the following, “not likely,” “at least as likely as not,” “more than likely,” and “highly likely.” If the doctor views the condition as at least 50% certain that the condition is service related, then the medical professional can use “more than likely” in his evaluation.

Above all, focus on the facts. In this post, we talk about what to share to get your story told, without exaggerating.