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November 27, 2023

15+ Ways to Get a VA Disability Rating for Dental Conditions!

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If you want to learn how to implement these strategies to get the VA benefits you deserve, click here to speak with a VA claim expert for free.

Today, Brian Reese the VA Claims Insider explains 15+ ways to get a VA disability rating for dental conditions.

The VA rates dental and oral conditions under various Diagnostic Codes (DCs) in 38 CFR § 4.150, 9900 to 9918.

VA mouth and teeth ratings range from 0% to 100% in increments of 10%, depending on the disability diagnosis as well as the frequency, severity, and duration of symptoms.

Let’s take a deeper look into VA ratings for dental and oral conditions.

What is the VA Disability Rating for Dental Conditions?

va dental disability ratings

In each of these 15+ different VA dental disability ratings, I’ve provided simple and easy explanations of the meaning of the various medical terms.

#1. DC 9900 Maxilla or mandible, chronic osteomyelitis, osteonecrosis, or osteoradionecrosis of, rate as osteomyelitis, chronic under DC 5000:

  • Of the pelvis, vertebrae, or extending into major joints, or with multiple localization or with long history of intractability and debility, anemia, amyloid liver changes, or other continuous constitutional symptoms rate at 100%
  • Frequent episodes, with constitutional symptoms rate at 60%
  • With definite involucrum or sequestrum, with or without discharging sinus rate at 30%
  • With discharging sinus or other evidence of active infection within the past 5 years rate at 20%
  • Inactive, following repeated episodes, without evidence of active infection in past 5 years rate at 10%

Note (1): A rating of 10 percent, as an exception to the amputation rule, is to be assigned in any case of active osteomyelitis where the amputation rating for the affected part is no percent. This 10 percent rating and the other partial ratings of 30 percent or less are to be combined with ratings for ankylosis, limited motion, nonunion or malunion, shortening, etc., subject, of course, to the amputation rule. The 60 percent rating, as it is based on constitutional symptoms, is not subject to the amputation rule. A rating for osteomyelitis will not be applied following cure by removal or radical resection of the affected bone.

Note (2): The 20 percent rating based on activity within the past 5 years is not assignable following the initial infection of active osteomyelitis with no subsequent reactivation. The prerequisite for this historical rating is an established recurrent osteomyelitis. To qualify for the 10 percent rating, 2 or more episodes following the initial infection are required. This 20 percent rating or the 10 percent rating, when applicable, will be assigned once only to cover disability at all sites of previously active infection with a future ending date in the case of the 20 percent rating.

Explanation:

  • Maxilla: The maxilla is the upper jawbone, and it plays a crucial role in facial structure and the ability to chew food. It contains the upper teeth and forms the roof of the mouth (palate).
  • Mandible: The mandible is the lower jawbone, which houses the lower teeth and allows for movements such as chewing, speaking, and facial expression.
  • Chronic Osteomyelitis: Osteomyelitis is a medical term for a bone infection. Chronic osteomyelitis refers to a long-lasting or recurring infection of the bone. In this context, it means that either the maxilla or mandible has been affected by a persistent bone infection.
  • Osteonecrosis: Osteonecrosis is a condition where a portion of bone tissue dies due to a lack of blood supply. This can lead to bone weakening and damage.
  • Osteoradionecrosis: Osteoradionecrosis is a specific type of bone damage that can occur as a side effect of radiation therapy. It typically affects bones in areas that have been irradiated for the treatment of cancer. In this case, it suggests that either the maxilla or mandible has experienced bone damage due to radiation therapy.

#2. DC 9901 Mandible, loss of, complete, between angles rate at 100%

Explanation:

In medical terminology, this description refers to a severe and significant condition where the entire lower jawbone (mandible) has been lost or is absent between the angles.

Such a condition could result from various causes, including trauma, surgical removal, or congenital abnormalities.

Loss of the entire mandible between the angles can have a profound impact on a person’s ability to eat, speak, and maintain proper facial structure.

#3. DC 9902 Mandible, loss of, including ramus, unilaterally or bilaterally:

Loss of one-half or more, involving temporomandibular articulation.             

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 70%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 50%

Not involving temporomandibular articulation.      

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 40%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 30%

Loss of less than one-half, involving temporomandibular articulation.   

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 70%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 50%

Not involving temporomandibular articulation.      

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 20%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 10%

Explanation:

  • Mandible: The mandible is the lower jawbone in the human skull. It is a U-shaped bone that forms the lower part of the jaw and holds the lower teeth. The mandible plays a vital role in various functions, including chewing, speaking, and supporting facial structures.
  • Loss of: “Loss of” in this context refers to the absence or removal of a part or the entire mandible.
  • Including Ramus: The term “ramus” refers to the vertical or upright extensions of the mandible. Specifically, the mandible has two ascending rami, one on each side, which extend upwards from the body of the mandible. These rami play a role in attaching muscles involved in chewing and jaw movement.
  • Unilaterally or Bilaterally: “Unilaterally” means that the condition affects only one side of the mandible, either the left or the right. “Bilaterally” means that the condition affects both sides of the mandible, meaning that both ascending rami are involved.

Thus, when the DC description mentions “Mandible, loss of, including ramus, unilaterally or bilaterally,” it means that there is a significant absence or removal of part or all of the mandible, including the ascending ramus, and this can occur either on one side of the jaw (unilaterally) or on both sides (bilaterally).

Such a condition could result from various causes, including traumatic injuries, surgical removal due to disease or tumors, congenital abnormalities, or other medical conditions.

The extent of the loss and its impact on a person’s ability to eat, speak, and maintain proper facial structure would depend on the specific circumstances and whether it is unilateral or bilateral.

#4. DC 9903 Mandible, nonunion of, confirmed by diagnostic imaging studies:

  • Severe, with false motion rate at 30%
  • Moderate, without false motion rate at 10%

Explanation:

  • Mandible: This indicates that the condition involves the mandible, which is the lower jawbone in the human skull.
  • Nonunion of: This phrase means that the bone fracture in the mandible has not healed correctly or has failed to fuse back together as it should.
  • Confirmed by diagnostic imaging studies: To establish nonunion, the condition is typically confirmed through diagnostic imaging studies, such as X-rays or CT scans, which can provide visual evidence of the unhealed fracture.
  • False motion: False motion refers to a lack of stability in the fractured area, which can result in abnormal jaw movement. A severe nonunion with a high false motion rate can significantly impact a veteran’s ability to chew, speak, and perform other essential functions.

#5. DC 9904 Mandible, malunion of:

  • Displacement, causing severe anterior or posterior open bite rate at 20%
  • Displacement, causing moderate anterior or posterior open bite rate at 10%
  • Displacement, not causing anterior or posterior open bite rate at 0%

Explanation:

The term “Mandible, malunion of” refers to a condition involving the mandible, which is the lower jawbone, where a fracture or break in the bone has healed improperly, resulting in malunion.

In this context, malunion means that the fractured segments of the mandible have healed in a way that has caused displacement or misalignment of the bone.

  • Displacement, causing severe anterior or posterior open bite rate at 20%: This rating indicates that the malunion of the mandible has led to a significant displacement of the bone, causing a severe anterior (front) or posterior (back) open bite. An open bite refers to a condition where the upper and lower teeth do not meet properly when the jaw is closed. In this case, the severe open bite is rated at 20%, reflecting the substantial impact on the individual’s ability to chew, speak, and perform other functions.
  • Displacement, causing moderate anterior or posterior open bite rate at 10%: This rating suggests that the malunion has resulted in a moderate anterior or posterior open bite, which is less severe than in the first category. The open bite is rated at 10%, indicating a moderate impact on function but not as severe as the first category.
  • Displacement, not causing anterior or posterior open bite rate at 0%: In this category, the malunion has caused displacement of the mandible, but it has not resulted in an anterior or posterior open bite. The rating in this case is 0%, which means that there is no additional compensation or disability rating assigned for this condition because it is not causing a significant functional impairment.

#6. DC 9905 Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD):

Interincisal range: 0 to 10 millimeters (mm) of maximum unassisted vertical opening.         

  • With dietary restrictions to all mechanically altered foods rate at 50%
  • Without dietary restrictions to mechanically altered foods rate at 40%

Interincisal range: 11 to 20 mm of maximum unassisted vertical opening.          

  • With dietary restrictions to all mechanically altered foods rate at 40%
  • Without dietary restrictions to mechanically altered foods rate at 30%

Interincisal range: 21 to 29 mm of maximum unassisted vertical opening.          

  • With dietary restrictions to full liquid and pureed foods rate at 40%
  • With dietary restrictions to soft and semi-solid foods rate at 30%
  • Without dietary restrictions to mechanically altered foods rate at 20%

Interincisal range: 30 to 34 mm of maximum unassisted vertical opening.          

  • With dietary restrictions to full liquid and pureed foods rate at 30%
  • With dietary restrictions to soft and semi-solid foods rate at 20%
  • Without dietary restrictions to mechanically altered foods rate at 10%

Lateral excursion range of motion:   

  • 0 to 4 mm rate at 10%

Explanation:

Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) is a medical condition that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which is the joint that connects the jawbone (mandible) to the skull (temporal bone).

TMD can cause various symptoms and issues related to jaw movement and function, leading to pain, discomfort, and limited range of motion in the jaw.

It’s a common condition and can have various causes, including jaw injury, arthritis, muscle tension, or grinding of the teeth (bruxism).

  • Interincisal range: This refers to the range of motion in the jaw when a person opens their mouth vertically, measured in millimeters (mm) of maximum unassisted vertical opening. It is an essential factor in assessing the severity of TMD.
  • Lateral excursion range of motion (0 to 4 mm): This category assesses the range of side-to-side movement of the jaw. A limited range of lateral movement (0 to 4 mm) is associated with a 10% disability rating.

Note (1): Ratings for limited interincisal movement shall not be combined with ratings for limited lateral excursion  

Note (2): For VA compensation purposes, the normal maximum unassisted range of vertical jaw opening is from 35 to 50 mm          

Note (3): For VA compensation purposes, mechanically altered foods are defined as altered by blending, chopping, grinding, or mashing so that they are easy to chew and swallow. There are four levels of mechanically altered foods: full liquid, puree, soft, and semisolid foods. To warrant elevation based on mechanically altered foods, the use of texture-modified diets must be recorded or verified by a physician

#7. DC 9908 Condyloid process, loss of, one or both sides rate at 30%

Explanation:

  • Condyloid Process: The condyloid process refers to the bony projections on the mandible (lower jawbone) that articulate with the temporal bones of the skull to form the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). These joints are essential for jaw movement, including chewing, speaking, and other oral functions.
  • Loss of: “Loss of” in this context refers to the absence or removal of one or both condyloid processes.
  • One or Both Sides: This part indicates that the loss of the condyloid process can occur on one side (unilaterally) or on both sides (bilaterally) of the mandible.

A loss of one or both condyloid processes can have a significant impact on an individual’s jaw function and overall quality of life.

The condyloid processes are crucial for proper jaw movement and alignment, and their absence or loss can lead to difficulties in chewing, speaking, and other oral functions.

The disability rating of 30% reflects the substantial impairment and challenges that arise from this condition.

#8. DC 9909 Coronoid process, loss of:

  • Bilateral rate at 20%
  • Unilateral rate at 10%

Explanation:

The “Coronoid process, loss of, unilateral or bilateral” refers to a medical condition involving the loss of one or both coronoid processes of the mandible.

The coronoid process is a bony projection on the mandible, and its function is related to the movement of the jaw, particularly during actions like opening the mouth widely.

  • Coronoid Process: The coronoid process is one of the bony structures of the mandible (lower jawbone). It is located at the upper front part of the mandible and plays a role in jaw movement.
  • Loss of: “Loss of” in this context indicates that one or both coronoid processes are missing, damaged, or surgically removed.
  • Unilateral or Bilateral: This specifies that the loss of the coronoid process can occur on one side of the mandible (unilateral) or on both sides (bilateral).

The loss of one or both coronoid processes can significantly impact a person’s ability to open their mouth widely, chew, and perform various oral functions.

It may result from various causes, including trauma, surgery, or other medical conditions affecting the jaw.

#9. DC 9911 Hard palate, loss of:

  • Loss of half or more, not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 30%
  • Loss of less than half, not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 20%
  • Loss of half or more, replaceable by prosthesis rate at 10%
  • Loss of less than half, replaceable by prosthesis rate at 0%

Explanation:

“Hard palate, loss of” refers to a medical condition involving the loss of a portion of the hard palate, which is the bony portion of the roof of the mouth.

This condition can result from various causes, such as trauma, surgical procedures, or medical conditions.

  • Loss of half or more, not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 30%: If a person has lost half or more of their hard palate, and this loss cannot be effectively replaced by a dental or oral prosthesis (such as a dental implant or bridge), they will receive a disability rating of 30%. This rating reflects a significant impairment in the person’s ability to speak and eat due to the extensive loss of the hard palate.
  • Loss of less than half, not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 20%: If the loss of the hard palate is less than half but is still not replaceable by a prosthesis, the person will receive a disability rating of 20%. This indicates a less severe but still significant loss that affects their oral functions.
  • Loss of half or more, replaceable by prosthesis rate at 10%: In cases where the hard palate loss is extensive (half or more) but can be effectively replaced by a dental prosthesis, the disability rating is 10%. While a prosthesis can help restore some function, the loss is still considered significant.
  • Loss of less than half, replaceable by prosthesis rate at 0%: If the loss of the hard palate is less than half and can be adequately replaced by a prosthesis, there is no additional disability rating assigned (0%). This means that the loss, while requiring a prosthesis for restoration, does not result in additional compensation.

#10. DC 9913 Teeth, loss of, due to loss of substance of body of maxilla or mandible without loss of continuity:

Where the lost masticatory surface cannot be restored by suitable prosthesis:      

  • Loss of all teeth rate at 40%
  • Loss of all upper teeth rate at 30%
  • Loss of all lower teeth rate at 30%
  • All upper and lower posterior teeth missing rate at 20%
  • All upper and lower anterior teeth missing rate at 20%
  • All upper anterior teeth missing rate at 10%
  • All lower anterior teeth missing rate at 10%
  • All upper and lower teeth on one side missing rate at 10%

Where the loss of masticatory surface can be restored by suitable prosthesis rate at 0%

Explanation:

  • Teeth, loss of, due to loss of substance of body of maxilla or mandible without loss of continuity: This indicates that the loss of teeth is a result of damage or loss of bone substance in the maxilla or mandible, but there is no break or loss of continuity in the jawbones themselves.
  • Where the lost masticatory surface cannot be restored by suitable prosthesis: This specifies that the disability ratings are based on the ability or inability to restore the lost chewing surfaces of the teeth using dental prostheses (e.g., dentures or dental implants).

The disability ratings are divided into different categories based on the extent of tooth loss:

  • Loss of all teeth rate at 40%: If a veteran has lost all their teeth, they will receive a disability rating of 40%. This reflects the significant impact on their ability to chew and perform essential oral functions.
  • Loss of all upper teeth rate at 30%: If only the upper teeth are lost, the disability rating is 30%. The loss of the upper teeth alone is considered less severe than the loss of all teeth.
  • Loss of all lower teeth rate at 30%: Similarly, if only the lower teeth are lost, the disability rating is 30%. The loss of the lower teeth alone is also considered less severe than the loss of all teeth.
  • All upper and lower posterior teeth missing rate at 20%: This category covers the loss of the posterior (back) teeth in both the upper and lower jaws, resulting in a 20% disability rating.
  • All upper and lower anterior teeth missing rate at 20%: This category covers the loss of the anterior (front) teeth in both the upper and lower jaws, resulting in a 20% disability rating.
  • All upper anterior teeth missing rate at 10%: If only the upper front teeth (anterior teeth) are lost, the disability rating is 10%.
  • All lower anterior teeth missing rate at 10%: If only the lower front teeth (anterior teeth) are lost, the disability rating is 10%.
  • All upper and lower teeth on one side missing rate at 10%: If all the teeth on one side of the upper and lower jaws are missing, the disability rating is 10%.
  • If the lost masticatory surface (chewing surface) of the teeth can be effectively restored by suitable dental prostheses, the rating is 0%. This indicates that while tooth loss has occurred, it can be managed and restored using dental prosthetic devices.

Note: These ratings apply only to bone loss through trauma or disease such as osteomyelitis, and not to the loss of the alveolar process because of periodontal disease, since such loss is not considered disabling.

#11. DC 9914 Maxilla, loss of more than half:

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 100%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 50%

Explanation:

“Maxilla, loss of more than half” refers to a medical condition where more than half of the maxilla, which is the upper jawbone, is lost or damaged.

The loss of the maxilla can result from various causes, including traumatic injuries, surgical procedures, or medical conditions.

In this context, there are two specific scenarios outlined with associated disability ratings:

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 100%: If the loss of more than half of the maxilla is so extensive that it cannot be effectively replaced or restored using dental or oral prostheses, the individual is assigned a disability rating of 100%. This rating reflects the highest level of disability, as the loss is considered irreversible and has a profound impact on the individual’s oral function, appearance, and quality of life.
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 50%: In cases where the loss of more than half of the maxilla can be effectively replaced or restored using dental or oral prostheses, such as dentures or dental implants, the individual is assigned a disability rating of 50%. While the loss is still significant, the ability to restore some function and appearance through prosthesis results in a lower disability rating compared to the first scenario.

#12. DC 9915 Maxilla, loss of half or less:

Loss of 25 to 50 percent:        

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 40%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 30%

Loss of less than 25 percent: 

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 20%
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 0%

Explanation:

“Maxilla, loss of half or less” is a medical condition in which up to half of the maxilla, which is the upper jawbone, has been lost or damaged.

The loss of the maxilla can occur due to various factors, including trauma, surgical procedures, or medical conditions.

Within this context, there are two specific scenarios outlined for disability ratings, depending on the extent of the loss:

Loss of 25 to 50 percent:

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 40%: If the loss of the maxilla falls within the range of 25 to 50 percent and cannot be effectively replaced or restored using dental or oral prostheses, the individual is assigned a disability rating of 40%. This rating reflects a substantial degree of disability, as the loss is significant and not amenable to complete restoration.
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 30%: If the loss of the maxilla in the 25 to 50 percent range can be effectively replaced or restored using dental or oral prostheses, such as dentures or dental implants, the individual is assigned a disability rating of 30%. While the loss is still significant, the ability to restore some function and appearance through prosthesis results in a lower disability rating.

Loss of less than 25 percent:

  • Not replaceable by prosthesis rate at 20%: If the loss of the maxilla is less than 25 percent but cannot be effectively replaced or restored using prostheses, the individual is assigned a disability rating of 20%. This rating acknowledges the presence of some loss, though it is relatively minor compared to the other scenarios.
  • Replaceable by prosthesis rate at 0%: If the loss of the maxilla is less than 25 percent and can be effectively replaced or restored using dental or oral prostheses, the individual is not assigned an additional disability rating (0%). This indicates that while there is some loss, it can be successfully managed through prosthetic devices, and no additional compensation is warranted.

#13. DC 9916 Maxilla, malunion or nonunion of:

Nonunion:      

  • With false motion rate at 30%
  • Without false motion rate at 10%

Malunion:       

  • With displacement, causing severe anterior or posterior open bite rate at 30%
  • With displacement, causing moderate anterior or posterior open bite rate at 10%
  • With displacement, causing mild anterior or posterior open bite rate at 0%

Explanation:

“Maxilla, malunion or nonunion of” refers to medical conditions related to the maxilla, which is the upper jawbone.

These conditions involve problems with the proper healing and alignment of the maxilla following a fracture or injury.

Nonunion:

  • With false motion rate at 30%: Nonunion refers to a condition where a fracture in the maxilla has not healed properly, and there may be instability or false motion in the affected area. When nonunion is present with a high degree of false motion (30%), it indicates a more severe condition that significantly affects jaw function and stability.
  • Without false motion rate at 10%: In cases of nonunion where there is no false motion or instability (0%), the condition is less severe. The maxilla may not have healed properly, but it is not causing significant functional impairment. The disability rating in this case is 10%.

Malunion:

Malunion refers to a condition where the maxilla has healed, but it has healed in a way that results in a misalignment or improper position.

This can affect the bite and jaw function.

  • With displacement, causing severe anterior or posterior open bite rate at 30%: This rating category indicates that the malunion of the maxilla has caused a severe anterior (front) or posterior (back) open bite, where the upper and lower teeth do not meet properly. This severe misalignment significantly affects oral function, resulting in a 30% disability rating.
  • With displacement, causing moderate anterior or posterior open bite rate at 10%: In this case, the malunion has caused a moderate open bite, impacting oral function to a lesser degree. The disability rating is 10%.
  • With displacement, causing mild anterior or posterior open bite rate at 0%: If the malunion has resulted in only a mild anterior or posterior open bite, with minimal functional impairment, no additional disability rating is assigned (0%). This suggests that while there may be some misalignment, it does not have a substantial impact on oral function.

Note: For VA compensation purposes, the severity of maxillary nonunion is dependent upon the degree of abnormal mobility of maxilla fragments following treatment (e.g., presence or absence of false motion), and maxillary nonunion must be confirmed by diagnostic imaging studies.    

#14. DC 9917 Neoplasm, hard and soft tissue, benign:

  • Rate as loss of supporting structures (bone or teeth) and/or functional impairment due to scarring.           

Explanation:

“Neoplasm, hard and soft tissue, benign” refers to a non-cancerous growth or tumor that can occur in either the hard tissues (such as bone) or soft tissues (such as muscles or skin) of the body.

In this context, “benign” indicates that the growth is not cancerous and does not have the potential to spread to other parts of the body like malignant (cancerous) tumors do.

The accompanying statement “Rate as loss of supporting structures (bone or teeth) and/or functional impairment due to scarring” suggests that when evaluating and assigning a disability rating for a benign neoplasm in hard or soft tissues, the focus is on two primary factors:

  • Loss of Supporting Structures (Bone or Teeth): If the benign neoplasm has caused damage or loss of supporting structures like bone or teeth in the affected area, this can result in functional impairment. For example, if a benign tumor in the jawbone has caused the loss of teeth or weakened the bone structure, it can affect an individual’s ability to chew, speak, or perform other oral functions.
  • Functional Impairment Due to Scarring: Benign neoplasms can sometimes be surgically removed, and the surgical procedure may leave behind scars or tissue damage. These scars or residual effects from the tumor or surgery can lead to functional impairment. For example, scarring in soft tissues might limit joint mobility or muscle function.

#15. DC 9918 Neoplasm, hard and soft tissue, malignant rate at 100%

Explanation:

“Neoplasm, hard and soft tissue, malignant rate at 100%” refers to a medical condition in which there is a malignant (cancerous) tumor or growth present in either the hard tissues (such as bone) or soft tissues (such as muscles, skin, or organs) of the body.

In this context, “malignant” indicates that the tumor has the potential to grow uncontrollably, invade surrounding tissues, and spread to other parts of the body, often leading to severe health consequences.

The disability rating of 100% in this context signifies that the presence of a malignant neoplasm in hard or soft tissues is considered a complete and total disability.

A rating of 100% indicates the most severe level of disability, and it reflects the significant impact that cancer can have on an individual’s health and overall well-being.

Note: A rating of 100 percent shall continue beyond the cessation of any surgical, radiation, antineoplastic chemotherapy, or other therapeutic procedure. Six months after discontinuance of such treatment, the appropriate disability rating shall be determined by mandatory VA examination. Any change in evaluation based upon that or any subsequent examination shall be subject to the provisions of § 3.105(e). If there has been no local recurrence or metastasis, rate on residuals such as loss of supporting structures (bone or teeth) and/or functional impairment due to scarring.

About the Author

Brian Reese
Brian Reese

Brian Reese

Brian Reese is one of the top VA disability benefits experts in the world and bestselling author of You Deserve It: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Veteran Benefits You’ve Earned (Second Edition).

Brian’s frustration with the VA claim process led him to create VA Claims Insider, which provides disabled veterans with tips, strategies, and lessons learned to win their VA disability compensation claim, faster, even if they’ve already filed, been denied, gave up, or don’t know where to start. 

As the founder of VA Claims Insider and CEO of Military Disability Made Easy, he has helped serve more than 10 million military members and veterans since 2013 through free online educational resources.

He is a former active duty Air Force officer with extensive experience leading hundreds of individuals and multi-functional teams in challenging international environments, including a combat tour to Afghanistan in 2011 supporting Operation ENDURING FREEDOM.

Brian is a Distinguished Graduate of Management from the United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO, and he holds an MBA from Oklahoma State University’s Spears School of Business, Stillwater, OK, where he was a National Honor Scholar (Top 1% of Graduate School class).

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